Tillandsioideae

Tillandsioideae disperse among arboreal and lithic substrates via small, wind-transported seeds structured according to a single aerodynamic design (Fig. 3.6J; Chapters 12 and 13). Most notable is the coma, which consists of numerous hairs extending from both ends of the integument (Alcantarea, Catopsis, Glomeropitcairnia), or just its base (all the other taxa). If hygroscopic movements like those that assist targeting by some other anemochorous taxa (e.g., Salix) also bene t Bromeliaceae, they remain unreported. Subtle embellishments of a different type probably do increase seed success in another way. Hairs comprising the ight apparatus of certain Catopsis species possess barb-like ends and these, like the joints and projections featured in some other taxa (e.g., Tillandsia balbisiana; Fig. 6.5D), seem likely to promote adhesion to substrates and perhaps especially

Table 6.6. Distance traveled by the seeds of 10 bromeliads native to Florida with coma present and removed. Note that the coma promotes airworthiness to different degrees for different species

Distance traveled (cm)

Table 6.6. Distance traveled by the seeds of 10 bromeliads native to Florida with coma present and removed. Note that the coma promotes airworthiness to different degrees for different species

Distance traveled (cm)

Species

With coma

Coma removed

Catopsis berteroniana

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