Broadleaved Plants with Opposite Simple Leaves

Plants With Simple Leaves

A leaf, not a leaflet woody

Leaf and buds opposite (useful in winter)

Phough more numerous than those of Section II, the plants with opposite simple leaves are still so few as to be rather easily identified. In winter, of course, plants with opposite leaf scars may be members of either Section II or III and the drawings in both Sections must be reviewed- Care should be taken that the leaves or leaf scars on the stubby, scar-crowded spur branches of some alternate-leaved plants are not thought to be opposite or whorled. No opposite-leaved plants have spur branches.

III- PLATE 12

Plants With Simple LeavesOpposite Leaf Tree

PARTRf DGEBER RY

LOW CREEPING AND TRAILING SHRUBS

us distinguished from climbing vines and erect woody plants. The creeping stems often take root. American Mistletoe (a parasite on branches of broad-leaved trees), p. 69, is included here.

V ST ANDREW'S CROSS, Ascyrum hypericoides p. 67

Sandy and rocky fields and woods; se, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, s. Indiana, s. Illinois, and Kansas to Florida and Texas,

V ST PETERSWORT, Ascyrum starts p. 68

Dry U> moist woods and fields; se. New York, e, Pennsylvania, and Kentucky to Florida and Texas.

V AMERICAN STRAWBERIiY-BUSH p. 68

Euon ymus americanus

Fertile woods; sc. New York, Pennsylvania, s. Illinois, Missouri, and Oklahoma to Florida and Texas,

* RUNNING STRAWBERRY-BUSH, Euonymus obovatus p. 68 Damp woods and thickets; w. New York, s. Ontario, aiul s. Michigan to Tennessee and Missouri.

V PARTRIDGEBERRY, Aiitchella repens p. 68

Forest floors; sw. Newfoundland, s. Quebec, and Minnesota to Florida and Texas.

i TWIN FLOWER, lAnnaea boreal is var. atnericana p. 68

Tundras, hogs, coot swamps; w, Greenland and Alaska to sc. New York, w. Maryland, W. Virginia, we. Ohio, n, Indiana, S. Dakota, Colorado, and n. California.

V ALPINE-AZALEA, Loiseleuria procumbens p. 69

Tundras and bogs; Greenland and Alaska to mts. of Maine, New Hampshire, and Alberta.

V PACHISTIMA, Pachistima canbyi p. 69

Rocky slopes; w, Virginia, W. Virginia, and se. Ohio.

V AMERICAN MISTLETOE p. 69

Phoradendron fiavescens (not ill us.)

PARTRf DGEBER RY

STRAWBERRY-BUSH ST. PEIERSWORT

TWfNFLOWER

ALPINE-AZALEA

Semi Erect

semi-erect

Leaves narrow not toothed

Twigs dark, rou ndf ridged; branchlets shreddy

ST. ANDREW'S CROSS ST. PETERSWORT

Semi Erect

semi-erect

Leaves finely toothed

Twigs green, square, 4-lined; branchlets smooth

Leaves egg-shaped narrow

RUNNING STRAWBERRY-BUSH

AMERICAN STRAWBERRY-BUSH

not toothed

PARTRIDGE

BERRY

not g^ toothed forming dense mats

ALPINE-

TWINFLOWER AZALEA

Twigs dark, round, leaves evergreen, BrancMefs not shreddy.

toothed

NJI toothed

PACHISTIMA

Leaves not leathery

Leaves leathery

FOREST SHRUBS ALPINE SHRUBS

Climbing by twining stems only and leaves not toothed (but see Japanese Honeysuckle); bark papery; branch lets hollow; scales present at twig bases; opposing leaf scars connected by lines.

Flowers of these vines are of Type A, except for Trumpet Honeysuckle (B),

Lonicera Japonica

5f JAPANESE HONEYSUCKLE, Lonicera japonica p. 71

Woods and fields; Massachusetts* Ohio, Missouri, and Kansas to Florida and Texas, i WOODBINE HONEYSUCKLE p. 71

L, periclymenum (not illusj

5r HAIRY HONEYSUCKLE, Lonicera hirsute p. 71

Thickets and rocky soils; w. England, w. Quebec, and Saskatchewan to Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Minnesota, and Nebraska, i MOUNTAIN HONEYSUCKLE, Lonicera dioica p, 71

Dry thickets and woods; sw, Maine, s. Quebec, Manitoba, and British Columbia to Georgia and net Kansas,

) ROCK HONEYSUCKLE, Lonicera protifera p. 72

Hocky areas; e. Massachusetts, s. Ontario, and se. Manitoba to Tennessee, Arkansas, and e. Kansas.

V YELLOW HONEYSUCKLE, Lonicera flava p. 72

Rocky areas; V Carolina and Missouri to tieorgia, Alabama, and Oklahoma,

5r PALE HONEYSUCKLE, L, flavida (not illus.) p. 72

^ TRUMPET HONEYSUCKLE, Lonicera sempervirens p. 72 Woods; s. Maine, Iowa, and Nebraska to Florida and Texas,

9 Four other t ines with opposite simple leaves, not honeysuckles, are treated in the text only. See Climbing Euonymus, Decumaria, False Jessamine, ami Silkvine on page 70.

Small Plants With Feathery Leaves

Twigs densely hairy; /eaves hairy, green on bof/i sides or purplish below (top 2 species)

Upper leaves not united un

Leaves mostly non evergreen

Black berries

JAPANESE

Flowers IV'-l", white or yellow, hairy inside

Red berries

HAIRY

World Largest Tree EverPurdue Simple Opposite Leaf

ever shaped,

Simple Leaf Plants

ever

Simple Opposite Leaf

Twigs nearly hair/ess; /eaves whifish beneaf/i; upper leaves united; berries red (lower 4 species)

United leaves usually in ted rounded

Uppersides green whitened

Leaves rather nearly narrow circular hairy (or not)

MOUNTAIN

ever green

Flowers W9-V\

pale yellow, hairy inside

Tips of united leaves somewhat rounded or pointed pointed

Leaves hairless

YELLOW

Flowers 1 not trumpet- trumpet shaped, orange-yellow shaped,

cora

ROCK

ever green

TRUMPET

III. PLATE 14

HONEYSUCKLES (2) — ERECT SHRUBS

Erect shrubs; leaves not toothed; bark papery; papery scales present at twig bases (see arrows); opposing leaf sears connected bv lines.

Flowers

Type A

Type C

V TARTARIAN HONEYSUCKLE, Lonicera tatarica p. 73

Woot/s borders and thickets; New England, Quebec, and

Ontario to New Jersey, Kentucky, and Iowa.

V EUROPEAN HONEYSUCKLE, Lonicera xylosteum p. 73

Escaped to thickets; New England and Michigan to New Jersey and Ohio,

V MORROW HONEYSUCKLE, L. morrowi (not illus,) p. 73 t BELLA HONEYSUCKLE p. 74

V FOUR-LINED HONEYSUCKLE, Lonicera involncrata p. 74

Afoi&f woods; e. Quebec, w. Ontario, and Alaska to New Brunswick. Michigan, Wisconsin, and in the West,

V SWAMP HONEYSUCKLE, Lonicera oblongifolia p. 74

Acid bogs and white cedar swamps; New Brunswick, se, (Quebec, and Manitoba to e. Maine, w. Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Minnesota.

V NORTHERN HONEYSUCKLE, Lonicera viltosa p. 74

Rocky or peaty soils; often swamps and bogs; Newfoundland, s, Labrador, and Manitoba to New England. Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Minnesota.

V CANADA HONEYSUCKLE, Lonicera canadensis p. 75

Woods; Nova Scotia, ne, Quebec, and Saskatchewan to il New Jersey, Pennsylvania, w. N. Carolina, W. Virginia, Indiana, and ne. Iowa,

V STAN DISH HONEYSUCKLE, L. standishii (not illus.) p. 75

Opposite Simple Leaf Examples

Leaves

Berries red, Type C flowers

Berries red, Type A flowers

ßranc/i/efs fioflow

TARTARIAN

EUROPEAN

Black Leaved Flowering PlantsOpposite Leaf Tree

Berries black; flowers, see text

Leaves mostly hairless blunt-

oval oblong

Berries red, Type A flowers

Twigs 4- lined

Bud scales long, pointed

Twigs unlined

_ Bronch/efs_ with white pith

FOUR-LINED SWAMP

Michigan Swamp LeafOpposite Leaf Tree

Lower bud scales as long as bud

BrancMefs with white pith mostly mostly hairy hairless

NORTHERN

Lower bud scales shorter than bue1

CANADA

Berries blue, Type C flowers

Leaves hairy or hairy-fringed

Berries red, Type C flowers

Copyrrghlofj rnn&erial io6 HL PLATE 15

DOGWOODS

Erect shrubs or trees; leaves not toothed; leaf veins follow the smooth leaf edges toward the tips; twigs often reddish or purple;

leaf buds with only 1 pair of scales.

Typical bud shown at right- fe

V ROUNDLEAF DOGWOOD, Cornus rugose p. 75

Woods and thickets; Nova Scotia, e, Quebec, and Manitoba to New England, w, Virginia, W. Virginia, Indiana, and ne. Iowa.

4 FLOWERING DOGWOOD, Corn us florida p. 76

Woodlands; s\v, Maine, s, Vermont, s. Ontario, s. Michigan, and e. Kansas to Florida and e. Texas.

V RED-PANICLE DOGWOOD, Cornus racemosa p. 76

Hedgerows and thickets; centr. Maine, s. Ontario, and Minnesota to Delaware, W, Virginia, Kentucky, and Oklahoma,

V RED-OSIER DOGWOOD, Cornus stolonifera p. 76

Wet places; Newfoundland, s, Labrador, and Alaska to New York, w. Maryland, W, Virginia, Indiana, Nebraska, New Mexico, and California, V STIFF DOGWOOD, C foemina (not illus.) p. 77

V SILKY DOGWOOD, Cornus amotnum p. 77

Wet places; s. Maine and Indiana tos. New England, Georgia, and Alabama.

* NARROW LEAF DOGWOOD, C\ obtiqua (not illus.) p. 77

ROUGHLEAF DOGWOOD, Cornus drummondi p. 77

Wet places; s, Ontario, Illinois, and Nebraska to Mississippi and e. Texas,

PRICE DOGWOOD, C. priceae (not illus.) p. 78

FLOWERING DOGWOOD OTHER DOGWOODS

Fruits bluish

Opposite Leaved Small Tree

Leaves broad roundish, oval, woolly hairless below

pairs of veins

Small Tree Oval Leaves Parallel Veins

Twigs, branchlets green or reddish, blotched purple

Twtgs, etc,, green to dark purple; flower buds stalked

ROUNDLEAF

FLOWERING

Fruits

leaves raf/ier narrow; usually 3-5 pairs of veins smooth, often hairless

Fruits white

Twigs brown, branchlets gray, hairless; pith brownish

Twigs, branchlets bright red, typically hairless; pith white

RED-PANICLE

RED-OSIER

Fruits bluish

Leaves rather narrow; usua//y 3-5 pairs of veins smooth (see text)

Twigs and branchlets dull purple, silky; pith brown jt

SILKY

Fruits white

Shrub Opposite Vein Dark Green

rough above, hairy below

Twigs reddish, branchlets brown or gray, rough-hairy; pith usually brown

ROUGHLEAF

ill PLATE iti

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Responses

  • Miniya
    Is rice an erect plant or a creeping plant?
    2 years ago
  • kelsey franklin
    Is black pepper leaves compound or simple?
    1 year ago
  • iiro
    What are erect plant and narrow leaves?
    3 months ago

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