Bristletips

Only oaks have leaves of this "feather-lobed" type, but not all oaks have such leaves (see Plates 47 and 18). Buds are clustered at tips of twigs. Oaks usually can be identified by differences in leaf shapes, bud types, and acorns. In winter, and when in doubt, consult the text.

Dry or moist woods; centr. Maine, s. Quebec, s. Ontario, and Minnesota to nw. Florida and e. Texas,

♦ OVERCUP OAK, Quercus lyrata p. 216

Coastal Plain swamp forests; s. New Jersey ton. Florida, west to e* Texas, and north in the Mississippi drainage to sw. Indiana, s> Illinois, se. Missouri, and se. Oklahoma.

4 POST OAK, Quercus stellata p. 216

Dry soils; se. Massachusetts, se. New York, se* Pennsylvania, W. Virginia, centr Ohio, s, Indiana, s. Iowa, and w, Oklahoma to centr. Florida and centr. Texas,

♦ MOSSYCUP OAK (BUR OAK), Quercus macrocarpa p. 217

Rich woods, prairie borders; New Brunswick, s, Quebec, st Ontario, n. Michigan, and se, Saskatchewan to w. New England, Maryland, W. Virginia, Alabama, and centr. Texas.

WHITE OVERCUP POST MOSSYCUP

ACORNS

Hidden page

V, PLATE 4b

OAKS (2) — LEAVES LOBED WITH BRISTLE-TIPS

f SCARLET-PIN OAK CROUP (see acorns and buds below) 4 SCARLET OAK, Quercus coccinea p* 217

Dry soils; sw, Maine, s. Ontario, s. Michigan, and st\ Missouri to nw, New Jersey, w. Maryland, n. Georgia, n. Mississippi, and ne. Arkansas.

♦ PIN OAK, Q. palustris p. 217 Bottomlands and moist woods; centr. Massachusetts, se. New York, st Ontario, s. Michigan, se, Iowa, and e. Kansas to N* Carolina, Tennessee, and ne, Oklahoma,

♦ JACK OAK, ellipsoidalis p. 217 Dry soils; n. Ohio, centr, Michigan, and s, Manitoba to n. Indiana, n. Missouri, and Iowa*

+ NUTTALL OAK, Q. nuttallii p. 218

Low woods; w, Tennessee, se. Missouri, and se, Oklahoma to Alabama and e. Texas,

+ SHUMARD OAK, {X shumardii p. 218

Bottomlands and moist jsoils, mostly Coastal Plain; s. Pennsylvania, nw. Ohio, and se. Kansas to n. Florida and centr, Texas.

♦ BLACK OAK, Quercus velutina p. 218

Dry soils; s. Maine, New York, s. Ontario, s. Minnesota, and se, Nebraska to nw. Florida and e. Texas,

Woods; Nova St otia, s. Quebec, n. Michigan, n. Minnesota, and e. Nebraska to Georgia and se, Oklahoma.

♦ SPANISH OAK, Quercus falcata p. 219

Woods; se. New York, s. Ohio, s, Illinois, and s, Missouri to n. Florida and e. Texas.

♦ BLACKJACK OAK, Quercus marilandica p. 219

Dry barren soils; se- New York, New Jersey, s, Michigan, and s. Iowa to ne. Florida and centr. Texas,

| SCRUB OAK, Quercus ilicifolia p. 219

Dry slopes; sc. Maine and New York to Maryland, w, N Carolina, and W. Virginia,

SCARLET PIN JACK SHUMARD

ACORNS AND BUDS OF SCARLET-PIN OAK GROUP

Quercus Falcata Ohio

Deeply lobed; see acorns and buds (opposite)

SCARLET-PIN OAK GROUP

BLACK

SPANISH

BLACKJACK

SCRUB

LEAVES LOBED WITH BRISTLE-TIPS

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