Bibliography for Scientific Latin Names

Dover Publications N.Y., NY. BAILEY, RALPH, Editor 1948. The Home Garden Self-Pronouncing Dictionary of Plant Names. The American Garden Guild, N.Y., NY. BORRER, DONALD J. 1963. Dictionary of Word Roots and Combining Forms. 3rd Printing. N-P Publications, Palo Alto, CA. FLORISTS' PUBLISHING CO. 1974. Dictionary of Plant Names. 12th Printing. Chicago, IL. JAEGER, EDMUND C. 1955. A Source-book of Biological Names and Terms. 3rd edition. Charles C Thomas,...

Myrtle pachystima mountain hedge mountain myrtle Oregon boxwood myrtle boxleaf

Range AZ, NM, CO, UT w. to CA n. to Can. Deep forests under shrubs & trees, 6,000' - 10,000'. Mountain lover is truly named it is found almost nowhere else except in high mountain forests. It especially loves shady places under shrubs and trees where it is moist. It is a low (no more than 2 feet high), spreading, evergreen shrub with small, oval, thick leaves with slightly toothed edges. To some they are reminiscent of the boxwood found in formal gardens. The minute (1 8 to 1 6 inch wide),...

Tetradymia canescens Sunflower family Compositae

Range AZ, NM, CO, UT w. to CA n. to Can. Dry, rocky or sandy soils, 4,500' -9,000'. Horsebrush is a freely branching, rounded, low shrub from 1 to 2 feet tall with jmerous short, erect flowering branches from a woody base. The flowerheads (p. 95) consist of 4 yellow disk flowers per head enclosed in 4 stiff, woolly scales. They are in clusters of up to 5 at the ends of the branches and bloom from June to September. The twigs and numerous small, narrow leaves are densely silvery woolly. The...

Squaw or lemonadeberry aromatic fragrant illscented skunkbush or threeleaf sumach lemita3

Sumac Tree Nut

Range Our whole range w. to CA n. to Can. e. to IA s. to Mex. Dry hillsides, canyons, valleys & plains, 3,500' - 9,000'. Squawbush is a shrub from about 2 to 6 feet tall with three leaflets, each of which is three lobed, resembling currant leaves. In spring, tiny clusters of yellowish flowers appear even before the leaves, and by summer, develop into bunches of dark red, sticky, slightly hairy berries. It is these berries that give the name lemonadeberry or limonada to the bush, as they are...

Mint bush hoaryrosemarymint

Range Our whole range w. to CA s. to Mex. Dry, sunny, sandy sites, 4,000' -6,000'. If you should see a medium-size shrub in the distance that Idoks as if it were covered with hoar frost, it is probably bush mint. The entire plant leaves, young stems, sepals is clothed in a silvery white coat of minute feltlike hairs. All in all a very attractive plant. It responds well to cultivation. In our range this mint grows not over 3 feet high and is very Typical mint flowers with lower and upper lips...

Approx 9500 11500 elev

This is the highest, wettest, windiest and coldest of all the belts in which full-size trees can grow In contrast to the fir-aspen belt immediately below, the trees of this belt are usually smaller, occupying streambanks and meadow edges growing in tight clumps of several mature trees surrounded by younger saplings or are found in more open locations. Here the heaviest snowfall of any of the mountain belts is encountered in fact, twice as much snow falls here as in the fir-aspen belt below....

Shadberry bush or blow Juneberry

Drawing Photos Rose Plant

Range AZ, NM, CO, UT w. to CA n. to Can. Moist, rocky hillsides amp streambanks, 4,000' - 10,000'. Serviceberry is very conspicuous in early spring when dense clusters of peculiarly fragrant white blossoms cover the bush before the leaves appear. It can be a tall shrub or a small tree from 6 to 15 feet high. Its leaves are alderlike and have teeth only above the middle. In the fall, its small, bluish purple, blueberrylike fruits ripen. They are slightly sweet and frequently used for jams,...