Info

Figure 5.6 A filament of Cuspidothrix issatascheenkoi containing heterocytes. The terminal cells are long, tapering and colourless. Scale bar 50 pm.

Figure 5.7 A filament of Planktothrix iso-thrix, with rounded terminal cells. Scale bar 50 pm.

Figure 5.9 Colony of Pan-dorina sp. The colony has a spherical structure with the flagella of each cell radiating outwards. Scale bar 50 pm.

Figure 5.8 Part of a colony of Gonium sp. showing the almost spherical biflagellated cells in a flat plate arrangement. Scale bar 50 pm.

Figure 5.9 Colony of Pan-dorina sp. The colony has a spherical structure with the flagella of each cell radiating outwards. Scale bar 50 pm.

Figure 5.10 A colony of Pediastrum duplex, composed of approximately X- or H-shaped cells joined at the tips. Scale bar 50 pm.

Figure 5.12 Colonies of ovoid-shaped Oocystis sp. cells. Three new colonies are contained within the original parent cell wall. Scale bar

Figure 5.10 A colony of Pediastrum duplex, composed of approximately X- or H-shaped cells joined at the tips. Scale bar 50 pm.

Figure 5.13 Closterium sp. -a crescent-shaped desmid. Note the two half cells with large chloroplasts containing pyrenoids. Scale bar 50 pm.

Figure 5.11 Scenedes-mus dimorphis - a colonial green alga composed of eight crescent-shaped cells. Scale bar 50 pm.

Figure 5.12 Colonies of ovoid-shaped Oocystis sp. cells. Three new colonies are contained within the original parent cell wall. Scale bar

Figure 5.13 Closterium sp. -a crescent-shaped desmid. Note the two half cells with large chloroplasts containing pyrenoids. Scale bar 50 pm.

Figure 5.14 Cosmarium sp. - a desmid with two distinct half cells joined at a central isthmus. Scale bar 50 pm.

Figure 5.15 A filament of the diatom Aulacoseira sp. Note the number of chloroplasts within each cell. Scale bar 50 pm.

Figure 5.16 Synedra sp. - a long, needle-shaped, pennate diatom. Scale bar 50 pm.

Figure 5.17 A small cell of Navicula sp. There are several hundred of species within this genus. Scale bar 50 pm.

Figure 5.16 Synedra sp. - a long, needle-shaped, pennate diatom. Scale bar 50 pm.

Figure 5.17 A small cell of Navicula sp. There are several hundred of species within this genus. Scale bar 50 pm.

Figure 5.18 A colony of the diatom Fragilaria sp. The pennate shaped cells join together lengthwise to form a raft of cells. Scale bar 50 pm.

Figure 5.19 A small ovoid shaped cell of Cocconeis sp. - in valve view - illustrating the patterned silica cell wall. Scale bar 50 pm.

Figure 5.20 A cell wall from Pinularia sp. These are large diatoms that have a heavy silica cell wall and are usually found in benthic habitats. Scale bar 50 pm.

Figure 5.19 A small ovoid shaped cell of Cocconeis sp. - in valve view - illustrating the patterned silica cell wall. Scale bar 50 pm.

Figure 5.20 A cell wall from Pinularia sp. These are large diatoms that have a heavy silica cell wall and are usually found in benthic habitats. Scale bar 50 pm.

Figure 5.21 A small cell of Peridinium sp., illustrating the epicone, hypocone and cingu-lum. Scale bar 50 pm.

Figure 5.22 Ceratium hirundinella - a large dinoflagellate often found in nutrient enriched waters, which can cause fishy tastes and odours and block filtration equipment in town water supplies. Scale bar 50 ^m.
Figure 5.23 Gymnodinium sp. - a naked dinoflagellate. Note the cingulum and the multiple chloroplasts within the cell. Scale bar 50 ^m.

__Figure 5.25 Phacus sp. - a flattened leaf shaped euglenoid. Scale bar 50 ^m.

Figure 5.24 Euglena sp., showing numerous small disc-shaped chloroplasts and other internal structures. Scale bar 50 ^m.

__Figure 5.25 Phacus sp. - a flattened leaf shaped euglenoid. Scale bar 50 ^m.

Figure 5.24 Euglena sp., showing numerous small disc-shaped chloroplasts and other internal structures. Scale bar 50 ^m.

Figure 5.26 A cell of Trachelomonas sp. - an armoured euglenoid. Scale bar 50 ^m.

(Figures 5.1-5.26 are courtesy of Water Environment Laboratory, NSW Department of Water and Energy.)

Figure 6.1 Common diatom species found in temperate coastal waters of New South Wales (Chaetoceros spp., Thalassiosira spp., Rhizosolenia spp. and Astrionellopis spp.). Width of photo is approximately 60 pm.
Figure 6.2 Common dinoflagellate species found in temperate coastal waters of New South Wales (a-c) Ceratium spp., (d, e) Dinophysis spp., (f, g) Protoperidinium spp. and (h) Noctiluca scintillans.
Figure 6.5 Common water discolorations caused by algal blooms in New South Wales marine and estuarine waters (a) Anaulus australis, (b) Gephrocapsa oceania (Blackburn and Cresswell 1993), (c) Mesodinium rubrum, (d) Noctiluca scintillans, (e) Trichodesmium erythraeum and (f-i) Noctiluca scintillans.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
10 Ways To Fight Off Cancer

10 Ways To Fight Off Cancer

Learning About 10 Ways Fight Off Cancer Can Have Amazing Benefits For Your Life The Best Tips On How To Keep This Killer At Bay Discovering that you or a loved one has cancer can be utterly terrifying. All the same, once you comprehend the causes of cancer and learn how to reverse those causes, you or your loved one may have more than a fighting chance of beating out cancer.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment