Bibliography

Action Potentials Obtained From Venus Fly Trap by C. Stuhlman and E. Darden in Science, 1950 American Droseras in Sidney by Stephan Clemensha, from Carnivorous Plant Newsletter, reprinted by permission by Plant Oddities Club, Butterworts and Bladderworts by R. E. Stauffer in Journal of the New York Botanical Gardens, 1950 Carnivorous Plants Rare Plants That Eat Insects by Allan A. Swenson, Plant Oddities Club, 1973 Carnivorous Plants Provide Fascinating Science Projects by Allan A. Swen- son,...

The Culture and Care of Carnivorous Plants

With few exceptions, carnivorous plants are rather easily grown. If you pay attention to the proper growing medium, the light needs and humidity requirements you can be successful with these wonders of the plant world. Unlike conventional house plants, carnivorous plants actually require less care. For one thing, they don't want or need fertilizer. That solves a common problem most people have with house plants. For another, thev have no need of insecticide sprays. That's good news to organic...

Containers

Greenhouse Plants

First step with carnivorous plants is the container. True, many can be grown successfully as potted plants. But here's a warning. Because car nivorous plants require lots of water to satisfy their needs for secreting insect-attractant aromas, digestive fluids, and providing the pressures for their snapping or closing, wrapping or folding actions, adequate moisture is essential. Luckily, terrariums have made a comeback. Carnivorous plants really enjoy life in terrariums. But as these plants need...

Venus Fly Traps

The easiest study project with these snappy little plants is a simple comparison of fed and unfed plants. We don't mean feeding hamburger, since, as you recall from the flytrap chapter, that will overtax the plants' digestive powers and can harm or kill them. Materials 2 growing containers, 12 flytrap bulbs, planting material. You'll need two identical, or quite similar, growing containers. Plant several bulbs in these two separate containers. Use glass fish tanks, terrariums, or any suitable...

Nepenthes

Nepenthes, those insect-eating pitcher plants of the Old World, are in a class by themselves. They deserve to be. Early explorers of the islands of the Indian Ocean, Asia, and in jungles of those faraway countries with strange-sounding names were undoubtedly responsible for some of the first stories of man-eating plants. Most likely they had seen some of the wild and weird nepenthes in action. That shock might lead anyone's imagination astray. In old botany books and documents, the first...

Butterworts and Bladderworts

Butterworts and bladderworts have the same hungry insect-eating habits as other carnivorous plants. Bladderworts, although mostly quite small, are primarily aquatic. True, a few are terrestrial, but most live their catching and dining lives in water. They appear quite active with their ability to seemingly vacuum tiny aquatic insects right into their digestive bladders, but since they are so small, and less easily grown, we'll leave them to the last half of this chapter. Butterworts rate...

Huntsmans Horns Sweet Trumpets and Cobra Lilies

Among the tallest, biggest, and most striking of the easily grown and more readily available carnivorous plants are the huntsman's horns. Huntsman's homs are actually the tallest varieties of the pitcher plants. That includes Sarracenia flava and its many offshoots, cousins, hybrid relatives, and associated friends. Typical of this family are their tall, straight, openmouthed growing habits. Many of the family have flaps over the mouth to partially conceal the yawning hollow pitchers which are...