Transportation of Harvested Fruit

Movement of pineapple from the field to its ultimate destination requires an understanding of the physiology of the fruit after harvest. If the travel time is short, as in the case

Fig. 6.20. Hand-harvested pineapples being loaded on a truck for transport to the processing plant in Johor Baru, Malaysia.
Fig. 6.21. Bin-mounted 'parasitic' harvester that moves with the truck while fruit are being picked.

Fig. 6.22. A, Tractor-drawn harvesting equipment used in the field in South Africa and B, close-up of harvester (photos A and B courtesy of Graham Petty); C, self-propelled harvester with bin for temporary storage of crowns to be used for planting material; D, self-propelled harvester following truck with movable bed to facilitate unloading of fruit at the cannery (photos C and D courtesy of CAMECO Corp.).

Fig. 6.22. A, Tractor-drawn harvesting equipment used in the field in South Africa and B, close-up of harvester (photos A and B courtesy of Graham Petty); C, self-propelled harvester with bin for temporary storage of crowns to be used for planting material; D, self-propelled harvester following truck with movable bed to facilitate unloading of fruit at the cannery (photos C and D courtesy of CAMECO Corp.).

where the fields are near the cannery, the key aspects are to move the volume of fruit efficiently, while minimizing damage. Damage, which reduces slice recovery, can occur from bruising during loading, transportation, unloading and conveying in the cannery system.

To understand the sources of bruising, extensive studies were conducted, evaluating the depth of loading in bins, the types of suspension on trucks, road conditions and the movement of fruit that result in impacts with stationary surfaces or with other fruit. As a result of some of these studies, some fruit are now transported with crowns, while other fruit are carefully stacked end to end in layers to minimize damage.

Fruit being transported to fresh markets fall into two major categories. Some are destined for the local market, while others are shipped significant distances by air, sea or long surface hauls. If the transportation, including air transportation, takes only 1-2 days, the fruits may not require refrigeration. However, fruit quality is usually improved if the fruit is picked ripe and held under refrigeration. Fruit that will be transported for 3 or more days should be refrigerated at temperatures between 7.2 and 10°C (45 and 50°F). Additional details of postharvesting handling of fresh fruit can be found in Paull and Chen (Chapter 10, this volume).

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