Oriental Medicine

G. thunberghii, known as 'Gen-no-shoko' in Japanese, is used in Kampo (traditional Japanese medicine) particularly as a remedy for diarrhoea induced by inflammation of the small intestine and also for liver and haematological disorders (Kimura et al., 1984). It also has been used to treat cataract (Fukaya etal., 1988). The biological activity is usually ascribed to the tannin content, particularly geraniin. Extracts of the plant have been shown to reduce gastro-intestinal motility in isolated...

Maria Lis Balchin

The genera Geranium and Pelargonium are invariably confused by the general public and also plant sales personnel, health food shop workers and alternative medicine practitioners, especially aromatherapists. This confusion has existed before Linnaeus (1753) and his binomial system of classification, where both genera were put under the genus Geranium, and although Sweet (1820) and other botanists reclassified them under two genera, acceptance by the majority of laymen as well as nurserymen is...

European And American Herbal Medicine

The species most commonly used worldwide is probably G. maculatum L., variously known as American cranesbill, storksbill, spotted cranesbill, crowfoot and others. This species is found in shady and moist ground throughout the whole of Europe and in North America from Newfoundland to Manitoba and as far south as Missouri. Both the rhizome and the herb have been used for medicinal purposes since antiquity to treat fever, including malaria, abdominal and uterine disorders, inflammation and as an...