Key Nematodes Threatening Major Agricultural Crops of Importance Worldwide

A major global challenge in the coming years will be to ensure food security and to feed the increasing human population. Nowhere will the need to sustainably increase agricultural productivity in line with increasing demand be more pertinent than in resource poor areas of the world, especially Africa, where populations are most rapidly expanding. Although a 35 population increase is projected by 2050 (World Bank 2008), an increase in food demand in the order of 75 is anticipated, due to...

Introduction to Nematodes

Despite their deceptively simple morphology and the fact that they are essentially aquatic, requiring at least a film of liquid for active life, they have been successful in colonising an enormous range of environments. Irrespective of their habitat, nematodes have a similar external morphology, with a worm shaped, bilaterally symmetrical, unsegmented body. The phylum Nematoda comprises > 25,000 described species and the importance of nematodes should...

Info

2.3.1.2 Economic Importance and Distribution Several species of root knot nematodes including M. incognita and M. javanica have been detected at damaging levels in almost all maize growing regions of the world (McDonald and Nicol 2005). M. africana and M. arenaria have been recorded on maize in India and in Pakistan, and M. arenaria has also been reported by several authors from the USA (McDonald and Nicol 2005). Above ground symptoms include stunting, leaf chlorosis and patchy growth. Root...

Key Nematodes on Food Staples for Food Security in Developing Countries

Cereals constitute the world's most important source of food. Amongst cereals, rice, maize and wheat occupy the most prominent position in terms of production, acreage and source of nutrition, particularly in developing countries (Table 2.1). It has been estimated that about 70 of the land cultivated for food crops is devoted to cereal crops. The global population is projected to increase steadily to around 9 billion by 2050 and with this demand for the staple cereals of rice, maize and wheat...