Mentha royleana Linn

Family Name:

Lamiaceae

Local Name/English

Kala podna, Venalay, Pudina/Mint

Name:

Flowering Period:

July-August

Status:

Common

Part Used:

Leaves

Habit/Habitat:

A perennial herb, grows along water courses in wet

places and also cultivated near houses in pots or in

small land patches.

Distribution:

Pakistan: Hazara, Kashmir, Poonch, Swat, Chitral,

Kurram, and Baltistan. World: Northwest Asia,

Europe, India, Nepal, and South Africa.

Diseases Cured:

Ethnobotanical

Uses: Phytochemicals:

Mentha Linn

Family Name: Lamiaceae

Description: A small, erect, rhizomatous, and aromatic herb up to 1 ft in height. Stem erect, branched, 4-angled, herbaceous, hairy, green or purple. Leaves simple, elliptic-oblong to oblanceolate, opposite, petiolate, and toothed, hairy, dark green, and aromatic. Flowers in whorls on axillary or terminal spikes, small, whitish or of cream color, and numerous (Fig. 3.59).

Medicinal Uses:

Collection: 2 kg of fresh leaves is collected by men, women, and children 12-50 years old, in summer (March-August). Leaves used in both fresh and dried forms; dried in shade for 5-6 days and then stored in cloth sacks for further use.

Recipes: 30 g of dried leaves of Mentha roylena, 15 g of dried seeds of Punica granatum (Druna), 10-12 g of fresh scales of Allium cepa (Piaz), and 1 tsp (5-6 g) of common salt are ground together daily for 7-8 min and mixed with water. This mixture is shaken well, filtered with a cloth or filtration pot, and given to patients suffering from cholera, indigestion, vomiting, stomach disorders and gas trouble. For children, xh cup (125 mL) of drug is given (at one time) 2-3 times per day for 1-2 days. For adults, 1 cup (250 mL) of drug is given (at one time) 3-4 times per day for 1-2 days.

Diseases Cured: Stomach disorders, gas trouble, indigestion, vomiting, and cholera.

Fig. 3.60 Myrisine africana Linn

Family Name:

Lamiaceae

Ethnobotanical Uses:

Fresh and dried leaves are used in chutneys; also used as

spice, stimulant, and carminative in curries and salad.

Phytochemicals:

Volatile oil, menthol, resin, tannin, and gum [36].

3.4.42 Myrsine africana Linn.

Family Name:

Myrsinaceae

Local Name/

Khukan, Babrung, Baobirung/African boxwood"

English Name:

Flowering Period:

March-May

Status:

Common

Part Used:

Whole plant

Habit/Habitat:

A common shrub in forests, found mostly in waste shady

places in loamy soil.

Distribution:

Pakistan: Balouchistan, Chitral, Peshawar, Swat, Hazara,

and Kashmir. World: Africa, Arabia, Afghanistan, Tibet,

China, Taiwan, India, and Nepal.

Description:

An evergreen shrub up to 2 m tall. Stem erect, branched,

and woody, with grayish-brown bark. Leaves simple,

alternate, entire, and lance-shaped, subsessile, green.

Flowers small, dispersed in racemes, numerous, minute,

and greenish-red. Fruit globose, drupe, dark blue to

black, single-seeded (Fig. 3.60).

Family Name:

Myrsinaceae

Medicinal Uses: Collection:

Recipes:

Diseases Cured:

Ethnobotanical

Uses:

Phytochemicals:

1 kg of ripe fruit and 25-30 g of fresh leaves are collected by men and children 12-40 years old, in summer (June-August). Fruit is dried in sunlight for 4-5 days and stored in cotton sacks or a glass or plastic bottle for further use, whereas leaves are used in fresh condition.

(a) 25 g of dried fruits is ground for 5-6 min. This powdered drug is stored in a glass or plastic bottle and given to patients suffering from intestinal worms. For children, 1 tsp (4-6 g) of powdered drug (at one time) is given with 1 cup (50 g) of curd or 1 cup (120 mL) of diluted milk (lasi) once daily, at bedtime, for 3-4 days. For adults, 2 tsp (8-12 g) of powdered drug (at one time) is given with 2 cups (100 g) of curd or 1 cup (250 mL) of diluted milk (lasi) daily, at bedtime, for

(b) 20-25 g of fresh leaves is boiled daily in 3 cups (750 mL) of water for 15-20 min; when 1 cup

(250 mL) of water is left, it is strained with a piece of cloth. Given to patients suffering from urinary disorders (scanty urination), kidney pain, skin diseases (allergy and pimples), and to purify blood. For children, 1 tsp (5 mL) of decoction (at one time) is given twice daily (morning-evening) for 6-7 days. For adults, xh cup (125 mL) of decoction (at one time) is given twice daily (morning-evening) for 10-15 days. The drug's taste is bitter and its color is light yellow.

Intestinal worms, urinary disorder (scanty urination), kidney pain, and skin diseases (allergy and pimples); also used to purify blood.

Leaves are used as fodder for cattle, goats, and sheep. Ripe fruit is edible; stem and branches are used in brooms, mud roof thatching, and as firewood. Fruit is also sold for cash. Ropes (sub) are made from young elastic stems.

Embelin, vilangin methylene bis (2, 5-dihydroxy-

4-undecyl-3, 6-benzoquinone), embolic acid, querctiol [28]._

How To Win Your War Against Allergies

How To Win Your War Against Allergies

Not Able To Lead A Happy Life Because Of Excessive Allergies? Want To Badly Get Rid Of Your Allergy Problems, But Are Super Confused And Not Sure Where To Even Start? Don't Worry, Help Is Just Around The Corner Revealed The All-In-One Power Packed Manual Containing Ample Strategies And Little-Known Tips To Get Rid Of Any Allergy Problems That Are Ruining Your Life Learn How You Can Eliminate Allergies Completely Reclaim Your Life Once Again

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment