Growing requirements General conditions

Lavender is a very old herb which was used as a disinfectant, antiseptic and relaxant, and for culinary, medicinal, and therapeutic purposes as far back as Roman times. Lavender is a hardy, herbaceous, evergreen plant that can thrive under a wide range of soil and climatic conditions, but it prefers a neutral to alkaline soil of pH 7-7.5. It will tolerate drought once the roots are established in the ground, as has been proven here during two very severe droughts. The first planting during 1982...

Investigations of Lavandula essential oils

The aroma of lavender must be one of the best known and the biological activity of the vapour from the essential oil has been investigated in several species including man. As early as 1920, Plant looked at the actions of 'waters' of lavender on intestinal activity in the dog and a year later Macht and Ting (1921) reported on the sedative action of the vapour from tincture of lavender on rats. More recently, Buchbauer's group in Vienna have performed detailed experiments on mice and humans...

Authentification of lavender essential oil

Due to the large-scale adulteration of commercial lavender oils, new ways of authentification have had to be developed. The tests which can be usefully employed have been studied by Using different columns DB-5, DB-WAX Chiral columns RT-S-DEXse with Mass spectroscopy (MS) or with FID Radioactive (14C) Stable isotope ratio (S13C and SD) The chiral analyses are especially good in the case of synthetic linalool and linalyl acetate adulteration and this is easily confirmed by the radioactive...

Problems arising in aromatherapy studies

Scant attention has been given to the actual chemical composition of the EOs used and even the exact botanical origin type of the oil was ignored, for example, there are many main commercial types of 'lavender oil', all differing in both genus and composition There are a large number of chemotypes of Lavandula EOs, and of these, often vague chemotypes are preferentially used by some aromatherapists (Lis-Balchin, 1999). The danger here is that little is known about them, the composition is very...

Introduction

The chemical composition of the essential oils from different Lavandula species, hybrids and cultivars show not only interspecific differences, but also intraspecific differences, which may sometimes be due to climatic, geographical or seasonal differences or due simply to the amount of watering or fertilization used. It may also depend on variation due to genotypes, which can occur either in plants growing in close proximity or in plants some considerable distance away, for example, in...

Section 4 Pterostoechas Ging

Woody based perennials or woody shrubs with pinnatisect to bipinnatisect leaves with distinct petioles. Bracts on axis of spike arranged in an opposite and decussate manner, subtending a single-flower with no bracteoles, giving a four-seriate (quadrate) spike. Subtending bracts ovate lanceolate in shape, with parallel veins. Calyx fifteen-nerved, bilobed the median posterior tooth often distinctly deltoid, the other lanceolate in shape. Corolla bisymmetrical, twice the length of the calyx,...

General introduction to the genus Lavandula

Lamiaceae) are mainly grown for their essential oils, which are used in perfumery, cosmetics, food processing and nowadays also in 'aromatherapy' products. The dried flowers have also been used from time immemorial in pillows, sachets etc. for promoting sleep and relaxation. Numerous lavender plants are also sold as ornamental plants for the garden these include L. latifolia, L. pinnata, L. lanata, L. dentata and L. stoechas and their numerous cultivars....

Scientific proof of EO efficacy aroma science Known bioactivities of EOs

These include antimicrobial effects, effects on the CNS, pharmacological effects and various other miscellaneous effects. EOs have been used externally to eradicate fungal or bacterial infections since the Black Death (and before) doctors would wrap scarves soaked in EOs like camphor round their necks and over their mouths when visiting patients (Valnet, 1982). This did not prevent the death per se, as the doctors rarely went near the patients, and only poked them with a long stick from a...

Research findings on psychological effects of lavender

The above review of literature and plays suggests common and consistent uses of lavender, certainly in England and the United States, and the primary psychological effect seems to be that of calming. This section examines the scientific research to see if there is a basis to this effect, that is, why lavender and its components might be calming, how it affects the brain and psychological states, and discusses issues related to the odour perception and, finally, examines whether these effects...

Old medicinal concoctions using lavender Lavender drops

This was a compound tincture of lavender oil, useful as a colouring and flavouring for medicines but also effective for fainting. This consisted of lavender mixed with rosemary and cinnamon bark, nutmeg and sandalwood and macerated in spirit of wine for several days used in a dose of teaspoonful to some water for indigestion (Grieve, 1937). The British pharmacopoeia officially recognised red lavender for 200 years. In the eighteenth century it was known as palsy drops and red hartshorn. The...

Relaxing sedative antistress anticonvulsive and spasmolytic properties

Thirty years ago a Bulgarian research team had already reported on certain central neurotropic effects of the EO of lavender and found this oil to be relaxing, calming and stress relieving (Tasev et al., 1969). In another paper the authors showed that linalool possesses central depressive effects similar to those of lavender oil, namely anticonvulsive, inhibitory to the spontaneous motor activity even if this had been stimulated by caffeine, or amphetamine pretreatment at higher doses it was...

Shakespeare 15641616

He mentioned lavender only once, although it was grown in herb gardens, especially knot gardens. It was probably not a common garden plant in his time, though mentioned by Spencer as 'the lavender still gray' and by Gerard as growing in his garden and the King's. Two centuries later, Leyel recommended 'a tissane or even a spray of lavender to cure nervous headaches, especially if worn under the hats of harvesters' (Grieve, 1937). Herbal Apothecary to King James I (1603 25) and author of the...

The taxonomy of the genus Lavandula L

In the introduction to the Natural History of the Lavenders published in 1826 the author, Baron Gingins de la Sarraz, wrote 'continuing progress in the understanding of natural history would seem to require also a constant revision of families and genera most familiar to us'. While much progress has been made in our understanding of the genus Lavandula his sentiments are still true today. The genus is currently subject to ongoing research into its taxonomy and systematics being undertaken by...

References

Al-Amier, H., Mansour, B.M.M., Toaima, N., Korus, R.A. and Shetty, K. 1999 Tissue-cufture-based screening for selection of high biomass and phenolic producing clonal lines of lavender using Pseudomonas and azetidine-2-carboxylate. J. Agr. Food Chem., 47, 2937-43. Bellanger, J.T. 1998 Perillyl alcohol application in oncology. Altern. Med. Rev, 3, 448-57. Bestmann, H.J., Erler, J., Vostrowsky, O. and Wasserthal, L.T. 1993 Pheromones.92. Odorous substances from the abdominal hair brushes of the...