Hot Flash Remedy report

Hot Flash Remedy report

Heres what youll discover in The Hot Flash Remedy report: The herb from central Asia that can stop hot flashes in one week! (page 17) How your brain gets tricked into firing up the furnace and how to recalibrate it. (page 6) 7 lifestyle factors that increase your odds of suffering from hot flashes. (page 19) 9 food items that bring hot flashes on fast and furious! (page 10) The bean that actually makes hot flashes non-existent for women in other countries. (page 12) The secret ingredient in your fruit bowl that extinguishes the flame. (page 17) Why 6 meals a day are better than 3 and eating more often wont make you gain weight! (page 10) How common wildflowers hold the key to shutting down hot flashes. (page 16)

Hot Flash Remedy report Summary

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4.6 stars out of 11 votes

Format: Ebook
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My Hot Flash Remedy report Review

Highly Recommended

I usually find books written on this category hard to understand and full of jargon. But the author was capable of presenting advanced techniques in an extremely easy to understand language.

My opinion on this e-book is, if you do not have this e-book in your collection, your collection is incomplete. I have no regrets for purchasing this.

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Femalespecific Health Considerations

When considering which natural substances to use for nourishing a woman's sexual vitality, the traditional focus is on herbal products that help to modulate female hormones. Yet, there are natural medicines that enhance blood flow, and these are also critical to a woman's optimal sexual satisfaction. These latter substances are discussed in the section about nutrients that are supportive for both genders. Female-specific herbs include dong quai (Angelica sinensis), black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa), chaste tree (Vitex agnus castus), and wild yam (Dios-corea villosa). Each of these herbs has the ability to modulate and amplify, as needed, the body's hormonal balance. They have all been used traditionally to address the signs and symptoms associated with premenstrual syndrome and menopause. (See Chapter 16 on female hormones.) Beyond herbal medicine, some good holistic approaches can maximize well-being and optimize sexual functioning. Some common lifestyle-improvement tips include...

Androgens And Breast Cancer

Although menopause is a normal physiological process, the symptoms that are so commonly associated with this hormonal transition, such as hot flashes, night sweats, and many other symptoms, are only clinical indicators of a deeper problem, merely clues reflecting an underlying state of hormonal imbalance. Current research studies are clearly demonstrating that other hormones besides estrogen potentially contribute to health problems and are, themselves,

Common Nutrient Depletions Caused By Pharmaceuticals

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is a common prescription for menopausal women. These estrogen progestin combinations are used to decrease symptoms associated with menopause, such as hot flashes, vaginal dryness, sleep disturbances, and fatigue. In the United States, from 1999 to 2002, approximately 15 million women were on HRT, accounting for 90 million prescriptions per year.2 The Women's Health Initiative study was widely publicized in 2002 this study demonstrated that HRT increases the risk of coronary heart disease, breast cancer, and strokes.3 Following the publication of the study, HRT prescriptions decreased by approximately 32 in 2003.4 Oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) also contain estrogen progestin combinations. OCPs have been shown to increase the risk of cardiovascular events as well as breast, cervical, and liver cancer.5,6

Nutritional and Economic Benefits

It can be processed into a number of fermented and non-fermented food products. Research into phytochemicals has shown that soybean contains phytoestrogens, and so may help in managing irregular periods, premenstrual syndrome, menopausal hot flushes and post-menopausal problems such as osteoporosis, fatigue and vaginal dryness (Holt, 1998 Connie, 1999). It may also help guard against cancers, including prostate cancer.

Case Discussion

Recently, a 57-year-old menopausal patient presented with numerous hormone-related symptoms, including hot flashes, night sweats, irritability, and vaginal dryness, that had not responded to standard hormonal treatment provided by her previous physician. After having the patient complete a 24-hour urine collection for a hormone-profile analysis, her clinical picture became substantially clearer. Her laboratory values reflected low progesterone metabolites, pointing to low progesterone levels. She had low normal testosterone and androgen levels and substantially lower-than-optimal cortisone and cortisol levels. This correlated well with her previous experience, when she had taken progesterone, either orally or transder-mally, and felt better. However, her severe atopic vaginitis with ulcerations strongly correlated with an effect caused by lower-than-normal estrogen. Thus, she had taken a preparation consisting of estradiol, estrone, and estriol. However, she experienced symptoms of...

Black cohoshbugbane

Uses Rubbing the fetid-smelling flowers on skin repels biting bugs (but may attract a few carrion flies and beetles looking for dead meat). Black cohosh has become a popular herbal remedy in treating meno-pausal symptoms, particularly hot flashes. Because most black cohosh used in the pharmaceutical industry is collected from wild populations, overcollecting is a potential threat.

Medicinal uses

Estrogens play a role in the control of body temperature. Soybean contains phytochemicals such as genistein, daidzein, and other phytoestrogens. These are the botanical equivalents of the human female hormone, but their effect is milder than that of estrogen and progesterone. However, they may ease menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats and vaginal dryness and perhaps alleviate premenstrual difficulties such as cramping and irritability. Isoflavones in soybean may also offer some relief from the pain, swelling, nausea and bleeding of endometriosis (Lock, 1991 Cassidy et al., 1995).

Isoflavones

Concerns were raised when isoflavones were found to stimulate cell proliferation in breast-cancer-sensitive cell lines (Zava and Duwe, 1997 Bail et al., 2000). Messina and Wood (2008) addressed these concerns by highlighting the point that isoflavone exposure at levels consistent with the dose in historical Asian soy foods does not elicit adverse stimulatory effects on breast tissue. Estrogenic effects of soy isoflavones have also been implicated in the association of soy food with moderating post-menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, fatigue and sweating.