Nutrition

Excessive nitrogen fertilization generally increases the green color of tree fruit and reduces their synthesis of anthocyanins. How much is excessive is difficult to predict in any specific location. Nitrogen is detrimental in the form of traditional soil fertilizers or urea sprays.

Color attracts people to fruit, as it attracts other mammals and birds to fruit. Humans are possibly more variable or more fickle about fruit color choices because some prefer green, some red, some pink, some striped, some cheeked, some solid colored, some with red flesh, some white flesh, some pink flesh, and on and on. Some even prefer the lack of color found in russeted fruit. As more beautiful fruit colors are bred and dependably produced, more consumers will be attracted to supermarket fruit displays.

Related Topics: BREEDING AND MOLECULAR GENETICS; FRUIT MATURITY; LIGHT INTERCEPTION AND PHOTOSYNTHESIS; NUTRITIONAL VALUE OF FRUIT; SOIL MANAGEMENT AND PLANT FERTILIZATION; TREE CANOPY TEMPERATURE MANAGEMENT

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

Cooper-Driver, G. A. (2001). Contributions of Jeffrey Harborne and co-workers to the study of anthocyanins. Phytochemistry 56:229-236.

Lancaster, J. E. and D. K. Dougall (1992). Regulation of skin color in apples. Critical Rev. in Plant Sci. 10:487-502.

Singha, S., T. A. Baugher, E. C. Townsend, and M. C. D'Souza (1991). Antho-cyanin distribution in 'Delicious' apples and the relationship between antho-cyanin concentration and chromaticity values. J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 116(3): 497-499.

Wilson, M. F. andC. J. Whelan(1990). The evolution of fruit color in fleshy-fruited plants. Am. Nat. 136:790-809.

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